Southshore Dental

Posts for category: Oral Health

By Southshore Dental
June 05, 2017
Category: Oral Health

Is your toothbrush pink after you brush? The problem could be caused by periodontal disease, also known as gum disease. Dr. Mehul gum diseasePatel and Dr. Heba Abuhussein at South Shore Dental in Trenton, MI, and serving the Riverview, Woodhaven and Brownstown areas, share information on signs of periodontal disease.

Gingivitis signs

Gingivitis, the first and mildest stage of gum disease, occurs when your gums become inflamed or swollen. Poor oral hygiene is a common cause of gingivitis. If you don't brush or floss regularly or don't do a good job, plaque builds up on your teeth and eventually turns into tartar, a hard deposit that can damage your gums. Gingivitis symptoms include:

  • Red, puffy, sore gums
  • Bleeding after brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Bad breath

Severe gum disease signs

If gingivitis isn't treated, you may develop periodontitis, a gum infection. In addition to all of the symptoms of gingivitis, you may also develop deep spaces around your teeth called pockets. Pockets form when your gums start to pull away from your teeth. Your gums help hold your teeth in place. If receding gums and pockets develop, your teeth may start to loosen. Loose teeth may also occur if bacteria begins to weaken your jawbone. You'll eventually lose teeth if your periodontal disease isn't treated.

If you notice pain when you eat, or it seems as if your teeth don't fit together the way they once did, an infection in your gums may be the cause. Visible pus around your teeth and very bad breath are other signs that you have severe gum disease.

How is gum disease treated?

If Dr. Patel or Dr. Abuhussein notice that your have gingivitis when you visit our office, they may recommend a deep cleaning, a procedure that removes plaque and tartar from above and below the gum line. After your deep cleaning, it's important to brush and floss regularly to prevent a recurrence. If you have severe gum disease, you may need surgery to remove diseased gum tissue and close the pockets around your teeth. In some cases, gum grafts may also be used to replace lost gum tissue.

Do you have any of these periodontal disease signs? If you do, schedule an appointment with Dr. Patel and Dr. Abuhussein at South Shore Dental in Trenton, MI, and serving the Riverview, Woodhaven and Brownstown areas, at (734) 219-6754 to make an appointment.

APediatricDentistCouldbeaGreatChoiceforYourChildsDentalCare

When it's time for your child to visit the dentist (we recommend around their first birthday), you may want them to see your family dentist. But you might also want to consider another option: a pediatric dentist.

The difference between the two is much the same as between a pediatrician and a family practitioner. Both can treat juvenile patients — but a family provider sees patients of all ages while a pediatrician or pediatric dentist specializes in patients who haven't reached adulthood.

Recognized as a specialty by the American Dental Association, pediatric dentists undergo about three more years of additional post-dental school training and must be licensed in the state where they practice. They're uniquely focused on dental care during the childhood stages of jaw and facial structure development.

Pediatric dentists also gear their practices toward children in an effort to reduce anxiety. The reception area and treatment rooms are usually decorated in bright, primary colors, with toys and child-sized furniture to make their young patients feel more at ease. Dentists and staff also have training and experience interacting with children and their parents to help them relax during exams and procedures.

While a pediatric practice is a good choice for any child, it can be especially beneficial for children with special needs. The “child-friendly” environment is especially soothing for children with autism, ADHD or other behavioral/developmental disorders. And pediatric dentists are especially adept in treating children at higher risk for tooth decay, especially an aggressive form called early childhood caries (ECC).

Your family dentist, of course, can presumably provide the same quality care and have an equally welcome environment for children. And unlike a pediatric dentist who will typically stop seeing patients when they reach adulthood, care from your family dentist can continue as your child gets older.

In the end it's a personal choice, depending on the needs of your family. Just be sure your child does see a dental provider regularly during their developing years: doing so will help ensure a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on visiting a pediatric dentist for your child's dental needs, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Why See a Pediatric Dentist?

By Southshore Dental
April 18, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sleep apnea   snoring  
DontLetSleepApneaRuinYourSleep-orYourHealth

Sleep apnea is more than an annoyance. This chronic condition not only interferes with your alertness during the day, it may also contribute long-term to serious issues like cardiovascular disease.

Sleep apnea occurs when your airway becomes temporarily blocked during sleep. Of the possible causes, one of the most common is the tongue, which as it relaxes may cover and block the back of the throat. This lowers the body's oxygen level, which in turn alerts the brain to wake you to clear the airway. You usually go immediately back to sleep, unaware you've wakened. This can happen several times a night.

Although older people are at higher risk, anyone can have sleep apnea, even children with enlarged tonsils or adenoids. If you or a loved one regularly experiences fatigue, brain fog, irritability or loud snoring, sleep apnea could be the culprit. You'll need a complete medical examination to properly diagnose it.

If you do indeed have sleep apnea, there are a number of ways to treat it depending on its severity. One prominent way is with a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine that produces a higher air pressure in the mouth to force the tongue forward and keep the airway open.

While CPAP is effective, the pump, hose and face mask you must wear may become uncomfortable while you sleep. We may, however, be able to supply you with a less cumbersome device: a custom-made oral appliance you wear while you sleep. Similar to a retainer, this appliance mechanically pulls and holds the lower jaw forward, which in turn moves the tongue away from the airway opening.

This oral appliance won't work with all forms of sleep apnea, so you'll need an examination to see if you're a candidate. With more advanced conditions, you may even need surgery to reshape the airway or remove soft tissue obstructions around the opening.

Whichever treatment is best for your situation, it's well worth reducing your sleep apnea. Not enduring these nightly incidences of airway blockage will help ensure you're getting a good night's sleep — and enjoying a higher quality of health and life.

If you would like more information on treating sleep apnea, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “If You Snore, You Must Read More!

By Southshore Dental
April 11, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

If you aren’t using mouthwash regularly find out if this little habit is something you should start doing.oral hygiene

Do you love the way swishing around that blue mouthwash makes your mouth feel? Do you just feel cleaner afterward? Perhaps you don’t use mouthwash at all but you are wondering if you should start. Dr. Mehul Patel and Dr. Heba Abuhussein at South Shore Dental in Trenton, MI, and serving the Riverview, Woodhaven and Brownstown areas provide a little insight into the world of using mouthwash.

If you feel like your teeth get a better clean because of mouthwash, you might be correct. By using mouthwash around you can dislodge food and plaque from between teeth and other areas of the mouth that you might not get when brushing or flossing. Mouthwash can be a great complement to your current oral routine, but remember that mouthwash should never take the place of brushing and flossing. You’ll also still need to visit your Riverview, Trenton, Woodhaven, & Brownstown MI, general dentist for bi-annual cleanings to keep teeth and gums looking and feeling their best.

Of course, there are some prescription mouthwashes that might actually be a better option for you if you are dealing with gum disease, have dry mouth or are prone to cavities. Our dentist can prescribe these special antibacterial rinses, which can be a benefit to your oral health.

If you are an otherwise healthy individual who isn’t dealing with gum disease or other dental issues, you can probably get away with choosing an alcohol-free mouthwash to keep teeth clean and your breath fresh. And remember: you don’t have to feel that burn from using mouthwash for it to be effective. Whether you choose to add mouthwash to your daily routine or not is solely up to you and your needs, but if it keeps you feeling confident about the freshness and state of your mouth, then, by all means, use it!

The next time you come into our office for your routine cleaning make sure to ask us whether prescription mouthwash could be a good option for you. Call Southshore Dental in Trenton, MI, and serving the Riverview, Woodhaven and Brownstown areas, today to schedule your next visit with us.

By Southshore Dental
March 24, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: local anesthesia  
LocalAnesthesiaisaKeyPartofPain-FreeDentalWork

We can easily take for granted the comfort we now experience when we undergo dental work. For much of human history that hasn't been the case.

Local anesthesia has been a major factor in the evolution of pain-free dentistry. The term refers to the numbing of nerve sensation in the tissues involved in a procedure. This type of anesthesia is usually applied in two ways: topical and injectable.

We apply topical anesthetic agents to the top layers of tissue using a cotton swab, adhesive patch or a spray. Topical agents are useful for increasing comfort during cleanings for patients with sensitive teeth or similar superficial procedures. Topical anesthesia is also used in conjunction with injections as a way to prevent feeling the minor prick of the needle. In essence, you shouldn't feel any pain or discomfort from beginning to end of your procedure.

Injectable anesthesia deadens pain at deeper levels of tissue. This makes it possible for us to perform more invasive procedures like tooth extraction or gum surgery without using general anesthesia. The latter form is a more intense undertaking: it renders you unconscious and may require assistance for lung and heart function.

Most important of all, subtracting pain sensation from the procedure helps relieve stress: first for you and ultimately for us. If we know you're comfortable, we can relax and concentrate on the work at hand. The procedure goes much more smoothly and efficiently.

Many people, though, have concerns about how long the numbness will linger after the procedure. This has been viewed in the past as an annoying inconvenience. But in recent years, dentists have become more adept at fine-tuning the agents they use as a way to reduce post-procedure numbness. There's also promising research on chemical agents that can quickly reverse the numbing effect after a procedure.

All in all, though, using local anesthesia broadens the range of dental work we can perform without putting you to sleep. More importantly, you'll be able to relax as we perform procedures that could improve your dental health for years to come.

If you would like more information on pain-free dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.



Contact Us

Southshore Dental

(734) 479-1340
2861 West RoadTrenton, MI. 48183