Southshore Dental

Posts for: April, 2014

By Southshore Dental
April 24, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   braces  
BracesARiteofPassageEvenforHollywoodKids

Her parents Will and Jada are Hollywood royalty, who helped her land her first acting role when she was 7. She released a hit single, “Whip My Hair,” before she had quite reached the age of 10; shortly afterward, she was signed to a record label. Yet the young singer and actress Willow Smith has at least one thing in common with plenty of ‘tweens and teens across America: She needed to wear braces to correct problems with the alignment of her teeth.

Why do braces seem to be a part of growing up for so many kids? One answer is because they work so well. Braces apply gentle pressure to the teeth through a thin, flexible wire called an archwire. Attached to the teeth with a metal or ceramic bracket, the archwire exerts a light force which causes teeth to gradually move into better positions. Sometimes, when additional force is needed, elastic bands or other appliances may be used in conjunction with braces.

Most everyone is familiar with the silvery metal “tracks” of traditional braces. But did you know that there are a number of other options too? For a more inconspicuous look, you may be able to have braces with tooth-colored ceramic brackets; then, only the thin archwire will be visible in your mouth. It’s even possible in some cases to place the metal wires and brackets on the tongue side of the teeth. With this system, called lingual braces, the orthodontic hardware is truly invisible.

What if you didn’t need metal braces at all? Some people can get good results using a system of clear plastic aligners instead of braces. The aligners are worn 23 hours a day, but can be taken off for cleaning and for important events. They work best for correcting mild or moderate alignment problems.

Still, plenty of people feel that if they’re going to wear braces, they might as well flaunt them. That’s why some types of braces are available with bands that come in different colors. When Willow’s brother Jayden wore braces, he was reported to favor red and black ones. Jayden, who is about two years older than his sister, had his braces removed just before Willow got hers put on.

So if it turns out that you need braces, remember that lots of your favorite celebrities wore them too. And keep in mind that, depending on your own situation, you may have several options to choose from.

If you would like more information about braces or orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Magic of Orthodontics” and “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”


ProperOralHygieneisJustasImportantforImplantsasitisforNaturalTeeth

One of the great benefits that patients with implants enjoy is their imperviousness to decay: unlike a natural tooth, bacteria have no effect on the materials in an implant’s construction. That doesn’t mean, however, you can become lax in your hygiene habits — although the implants may not be susceptible to disease, the surrounding gum tissue and bone are. If those tissues become infected you could start to lose the implant attachment and, as it progresses, the implant itself.

In fact, the gum tissue that surrounds the implant may be more susceptible to infection than those around natural teeth. Teeth maintain a connection with the jawbone through the periodontal ligament. Besides securing the tooth, the gum tissue has fibrous attachments to the tooth to help the gum tissue endure a lot of wear and tear and resist the invasion of bacteria and food particles. Implants are anchored directly into the jawbone (where bone eventually grows and attaches to the titanium implant surface) and don’t develop an attachment with the ligament. Implants, therefore, don’t have the benefit of resistance to bacteria and food particles that natural teeth receive through these fibrous attachments.

As a result, patients with implants need to establish a conscientious habit of effective oral hygiene. Daily removal of bacterial plaque from teeth surfaces through brushing and flossing (and semi-annual office cleanings and checkups) greatly reduce the risk of infection and subsequent inflammation. It’s also important to monitor the condition of your gums, especially around implants. If you begin to notice bleeding, red or swollen gums, or other signs of possible gum disease, you should contact us as soon as possible for an assessment.

Proper care for implants and their supporting tissues is just as necessary, and perhaps more so, than it is for natural teeth. By providing that care, you’ll help ensure years of effective service from your implants.

If you would like more information on hygiene practices with implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Infections Around Implants.”


RestoringHealthandAppearanceThroughPeriodontalPlasticSurgery

The “wear and tear” nature of gingival (gum) tissue enables it to readily handle the chewing and biting actions of eating and still perform its most important function: protecting the roots of your teeth from decay and environmental exposure. But while they're resilient, they're not invincible: it's quite possible for them to lose their attachment to a tooth and begin to recede, leaving the root surfaces exposed.

Gum recession can occur for a number of reasons: poor oral hygiene; over brushing and flossing; malocclusion (a poor bite); personal habits, like biting down on hard foreign objects; or poorly fitted dentures or other appliances. From a genetic point of view, people with thinner gingival tissues are more prone to gum recession than those with thicker tissues. Whatever the cause, the result is the same — the exposed tooth becomes more sensitive to environmental factors (such as heat, cold, abrasion or erosion). More importantly, it now has a higher susceptibility to decay and disease, leading to its possible demise.

But there may be a solution. Although the original tissue may be lost, periodontal plastic surgery can restore a protective layer of tissue to the tooth, and at the same time give you back the smile you once had.

From the Greek word “plastik” for sculpting or modeling clay, plastic surgery procedures restore both form and function to a bodily structure. While the term “plastic surgery” can apply to other procedures in medicine such as rhinoplasty or face lifts, the periodontal procedure particularly involves grafting similar tissue to an area of recession, and then “shaping” it into a natural, life-like form.

To graft means to remove tissue from a donor site and attach it to a recipient site. In the case of periodontal tissue, the recipient patient can also be the donor with the tissue coming from some other area of the same mouth (the graft can also come from another human or an animal). Using advanced techniques and a touch of artistry, the surgeon positions and sutures the graft in place.

The result: not only a new protective covering for your tooth, but a more pleasing appearance when you smile.

If you would like more information on periodontal plastic surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Periodontal Plastic Surgery.”




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2861 West RoadTrenton, MI. 48183