Southshore Dental

Posts for: February, 2013

By Southshore Dental
February 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TipsForDentalEmergenciesWhileTraveling

Planning a dream trip is something many people spend weeks, months or even years doing prior to their departure. However, in all of their excitement, they often forget about preparing for any “what if” dental emergencies that could occur while on the road. This is especially important if the trip will be overseas where you could face language barriers in addition to the concerns of finding qualified dental professionals you feel comfortable with treating an emergency.

The first and most important step you can take prior to departure is a proactive one: schedule an appointment with us for a thorough exam. (You should also do the same and schedule an appointment with your physician concerning your general health.) During this visit, be sure to let us know about your travel plans, where you will be going and what you will be doing so that we can ensure you are best prepared for your trip. For example, if you will be trying some new or high-impact activities, you may need a mouthguard to protect your teeth. Also, have any dental problems taken care of prior to traveling because pressure changes, especially during air travel, can cause pain in an untreated tooth.

As for seeking safe emergency dental care while you're traveling, here are some tips:

  • Be sure to carry your travel information with you at all times, including the names and phone numbers of organizations to contact in case of a dental or medical emergency.
  • Some good sources to contact in an emergency are:
    • Friends or relatives that you are visiting in the area
    • A local hotel concierge
    • If traveling overseas, Americans living in the area or American military personnel; The International Association For Medical Assistance To Travelers, a network of doctors and medical institutions around the world (www.iamat.org; 716-754-4883); American Consulate or American Embassy in the country you are visiting; or if in Europe, the American Dental Society of Europe (ADSE; www.adse.co.uk; Phone: 011 44 141 331 0088)

And be sure to take our address with you on your trip. We would love to receive a postcard from you while you're traveling!


By Southshore Dental
February 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TelevisionHostNancyODellProvidesAdviceforNewMothers

When her daughter Ashby was born in 2007, Nancy O'Dell was overjoyed; but she found the experience of pregnancy to be anxiety-provoking. O'Dell is host of the popular entertainment news show Entertainment Tonight.

After her baby was born she compiled her memories and thoughts into a book for first-time pregnant mothers. The book, “Full of Life: Mom to Mom Tips I Wish Someone Had Told Me When I Was Pregnant,” covers a wide range of topics — including oral health during pregnancy.

“While my dental health has always been relatively normal, pregnancy did cause me some concern about my teeth and gums. With my dentist's advice and treatment, the few problems I had were minimized,” O'Dell told Dear Doctor magazine. An example of her experience is a craving for milk that started at about the time the baby's teeth began to form. She felt that her body was telling her to consume more calcium.

As often happens with pregnant mothers, she developed sensitive gums and was diagnosed with “pregnancy gingivitis,” the result of hormonal changes that increase blood flow to the gums.

“I love to smile,” said O'Dell, “and smiles are so important to set people at ease, like when you walk into a room of people you don't know. When you genuinely smile you're able to dissolve that natural wall that exists between strangers.”

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about dental health during pregnancy. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nancy O'Dell.”


By Southshore Dental
February 10, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: wisdom teeth  
TestingyourKnowledgeTheFactsandMythsofWisdomTeeth

Of all the teeth in the mouth, the ones receiving the most discussion and controversy would have to be the wisdom teeth or third molars. And this is not just a recent phenomenon, as people have been discussing them for centuries! See how much you really know about wisdom teeth by taking our quick and easy true/false self test.

  1. Third molars received their name, “wisdom teeth,” because a moderate amount of wisdom is supposedly achieved in life about the time they appear.
    True or False
  2. Wisdom teeth and all of their associated problems are commonplace in the practice of dentistry.
    True or False
  3. Because wisdom teeth are so unpredictable, they typically make their appearance between the ages of 17 and 25.
    True or False
  4. The most common consequence of impacted wisdom teeth is gum (periodontal) disease.
    True or False
  5. If wisdom teeth are not removed, they will become impacted or cause crowding. This is why so many people require orthodontic treatment (braces).
    True or False
  6. While most people have four wisdom teeth, having more (supernumerary teeth) or less (hypodontia) is possible.
    True or False
  7. Through dental x-rays and routine check-ups, we can predict the timing and way in which wisdom teeth become visible (erupt).
    True or False
  8. An impacted wisdom tooth, by definition, is a third molar that is colliding with or jammed against another important structure, such as an adjacent tooth, the gums or other important soft tissues in the mouth, or nerves and blood vessels.
    True or False
  9. The primary symptom for indicating you have an impacted wisdom tooth is pain.
    True or False
  10. If wisdom teeth need to be removed, it is best to remove them at a younger age rather than waiting until periodontal disease has started.
    True or False

Answers: 1) True. 2) True. 3) True. 4) True. 5) False. While wisdom teeth can be a factor in crowding, some people have no issues with these teeth. For them, they grow into proper position and are healthy teeth. 6) True. 7) False. Unfortunately, it is not possible to predict the way wisdom teeth will erupt. 8) True. 9) False. In some scenarios, impacted wisdom may cause no pain. 10) True.

To learn more about wisdom teeth and in particular, impacted wisdom teeth, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions.


By Southshore Dental
February 03, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral cancer   oral health  
AreYouatRiskForOralCancer

Often perceived as a cancer that only affects older adults who have a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use, oral cancer is now on the rise among younger adults as well. New research has found a link between oral cancers, and the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a disease that is primarily spread through oral sex.

Importance of Screening: If you're concerned about oral cancer, rest assured that our office routinely carries out a cancer screening exam on every patient. We have several ways to painlessly detect abnormal tissues in their earliest stages. In addition, please contact our office if you experience any of the following signs or symptoms:

  • White and/or red patches in the mouth or on the lips
  • A bleeding or ulcerated sore in the mouth
  • A sore anywhere in your mouth that doesn't heal
  • Persistent difficulty swallowing, chewing, speaking, or moving your jaw or tongue

Although all of these symptoms can also be signs of less serious problems, be sure to alert our office if you notice any of the above changes.

Prevention: you can take a proactive role in preventing oral cancer by:

  • Conducting an oral self-exam at least once a month. Use a bright light and a mirror, look and feel your lips and front of your gums, the roof of your mouth, and the lining of your cheeks.
  • Scheduling regular exams in our office. The American Cancer Society recommends oral cancer screening exams every three years for people over age 20 and annually for those over age 40.
  • Refraining from smoking or using any tobacco products and drinking alcohol only in moderation.
  • Eating a well balanced diet.
  • Practicing safe sex.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any questions you may have regarding oral cancer. Read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Risk Factors for Oral Cancer.”




Contact Us

(734) 219-6754
2861 West RoadTrenton, MI. 48183